22
October
2013

The Health Benefits of Tea

How tea can benefit your wellbeing

Coffee, tea, milk, juice, mountain dew. Chances are we all have our go-to morning kick start beverage, or our afternoon lull reenergizing drink. I think it is safe to say that the most common good morning kick-start is something along the lines of a venti double espresso latte. However, there are so many amazing health benefits to drinking tea on a daily basis, that is just might make some of you coffee hounds switch to tea and crumps in the morning. Research attributes many of tea’s health benefits to polyphenols (a type of antioxidant) and phytochemicals (or phytonutrients that are another form of antioxidants).

Some research suggests that the antioxidants in tea could help protect the bodies against various forms of cancers, including breast, skin, lung, colon, esophagus, stomach, small intense, colorectal, ovarian, liver, pancreas, prostate and oral cancers. However, tea alone cannot help/prevent cancer. For example, regular drinking of team might counteract some of the negative effects of smoking, thereby lessening the risk of lung cancer. Tea can also help the body recover from radiation. In one study, tea helped protect against cellular degeneration upon exposure to radiation, and another found that tea can actually help the skin bounce back after exposure. Tea can also help destroy free radicals, which can cause damage to our DNA, because it is high in oxygen radical absorbance capacity. Our body is designed to fight these free radicals on our own, but it isn’t always completely effective. Damage from these free radicals has been linked to cancer, heart disease and neurological degeneration.

Drinking tea could help reduce the risk of heart attack and may help protect again cardiovascular and degenerative diseases. Drinking tea is also linked to a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease, when viewed with other factors like smoking, age and body mass index, physical activity, drinking tea on a regular basis was associated with lower risk of this disease, in both women and men. Tea may be an effective agent in preventing and treating various neurological diseases (especially degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s). Though we all know that there are a variety of factors that influence brain health, the polyphenols in green tea may help maintain parts of the brain the work to regulate learning and memory. Tea could also be benefical for people with Type 2 Diabetes; studies suggest that green could help diabetics better process sugars.

Tea can boost exercise endurance. Researchers have found that the antioxidants in green tea have the capability to increase the body’s ability to burn fat as fuel, thereby improving muscle endurance. Not to mention, tea is hydrating to the body, even though (some) tea has caffeine. Green tea has also been found to improve overall bone mineral density and strength. Tea may also shrink your waist size. In one study, individuals who consumed tea on a regular basis had lower waist circumference and lower BMI (body mass index). This may be due to the fact that regular tea drinking lowers the risk of metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of diabetes, artery disease and stroke. Although, it’s important to note that this correlation doesn’t mean causation.

While all of the above information supports the health benefits of tea, you cannot rely on solely drinking tea to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Many other factors are at work and it’s important to make sure you give your body a healthy diet, and sufficient physical activity.

Categories: Food and Health

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Nutrition Facts

22
October
2013

The Health Benefits of Tea

How tea can benefit your wellbeing

Coffee, tea, milk, juice, mountain dew. Chances are we all have our go-to morning kick start beverage, or our afternoon lull reenergizing drink. I think it is safe to say that the most common good morning kick-start is something along the lines of a venti double espresso latte. However, there are so many amazing health benefits to drinking tea on a daily basis, that is just might make some of you coffee hounds switch to tea and crumps in the morning. Research attributes many of tea’s health benefits to polyphenols (a type of antioxidant) and phytochemicals (or phytonutrients that are another form of antioxidants).

Some research suggests that the antioxidants in tea could help protect the bodies against various forms of cancers, including breast, skin, lung, colon, esophagus, stomach, small intense, colorectal, ovarian, liver, pancreas, prostate and oral cancers. However, tea alone cannot help/prevent cancer. For example, regular drinking of team might counteract some of the negative effects of smoking, thereby lessening the risk of lung cancer. Tea can also help the body recover from radiation. In one study, tea helped protect against cellular degeneration upon exposure to radiation, and another found that tea can actually help the skin bounce back after exposure. Tea can also help destroy free radicals, which can cause damage to our DNA, because it is high in oxygen radical absorbance capacity. Our body is designed to fight these free radicals on our own, but it isn’t always completely effective. Damage from these free radicals has been linked to cancer, heart disease and neurological degeneration.

Drinking tea could help reduce the risk of heart attack and may help protect again cardiovascular and degenerative diseases. Drinking tea is also linked to a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease, when viewed with other factors like smoking, age and body mass index, physical activity, drinking tea on a regular basis was associated with lower risk of this disease, in both women and men. Tea may be an effective agent in preventing and treating various neurological diseases (especially degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s). Though we all know that there are a variety of factors that influence brain health, the polyphenols in green tea may help maintain parts of the brain the work to regulate learning and memory. Tea could also be benefical for people with Type 2 Diabetes; studies suggest that green could help diabetics better process sugars.

Tea can boost exercise endurance. Researchers have found that the antioxidants in green tea have the capability to increase the body’s ability to burn fat as fuel, thereby improving muscle endurance. Not to mention, tea is hydrating to the body, even though (some) tea has caffeine. Green tea has also been found to improve overall bone mineral density and strength. Tea may also shrink your waist size. In one study, individuals who consumed tea on a regular basis had lower waist circumference and lower BMI (body mass index). This may be due to the fact that regular tea drinking lowers the risk of metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of diabetes, artery disease and stroke. Although, it’s important to note that this correlation doesn’t mean causation.

While all of the above information supports the health benefits of tea, you cannot rely on solely drinking tea to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Many other factors are at work and it’s important to make sure you give your body a healthy diet, and sufficient physical activity.

Categories: Food and Health

0.0/5 rating (0 votes)

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