All About Rice
03
October
2012

Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

Dietary Information For Rice: Pros And Cons

Nutrition Facts

Rice, brown, long-grain, cooked

Calories 111

Change Serving Size

1 cup
Serving Size
73.09
Amount Per Serving
Calories
111
Total Fat
0.9 g
1%
Saturated Fat
0.18 g
1%
Cholesterol
0 mg
0%
Sodium
5 mg
0%
Total Carbohydrate
22.96 g
8%
Dietary Fiber
1.8 g
7%
Sugars
0.35 g
Protein
2.58 g
Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

Rice is an excellent choice for everyday consumption because it contains many vitamins and minerals and also has a lot of fiber. It is very cheap and therefore easy to add to your budget. However, because of its high calorie and carbohydrate content, it is a good idea to limit how much rice you consume each day.

Categories: Grains

5.0/5 rating (4 votes)

Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

Rice is very filling and very cheap – you can buy many pounds of rice at the supermarket without spending very much money. Rice contains many vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin D, calcium, iron, and riboflavin. It is also very low in fat, cholesterol free, and a great source of iron. If you choose to eat brown rice or whole grain rice, the nutritional value of your meal will go up – whole grain rice is not as processed and therefore contains more nutrients. Brown rice is especially full of fiber, which helps regulate bowel movements.

Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

Since rice is a grain, it has a lot of carbohydrates. One cup of rice contains nearly 20% of the amount of carbohydrates that you should consume each day. People who are diabetic should be careful how much rice they eat because it can easily affect blood sugar levels. The amount of calories in rice is also relatively high – one cup of white rice contains about 250 calories.

Rice: that simplest of staples that forms the basis of the diets of billions of people around the world. And yet, cooking rice at home can be frustrating, more often then not producing a soggy slop or a charred mess. However, by following a few simple techniques, figuring out which works best for you, and adapting these methods to the particularities of your kitchen, you can make well-cooked, fluffy, flavorful rice.

  • The following recipes and times are for normal white rice. Other types of rice (such as brown or basmati) require different times and proportions; refer to package instructions.
  • Some rice is sprayed with a nutrient-infused mixture and should not be washed (packaging will indicate this). Otherwise, rinse rice thoroughly prior to cooking to remove excess starch and residual contaminants.
  • Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

    Here are a few recipes and tips to help you make that perfect rice.

    Recipe #1

    The easiest, most fail-safe method for cooking rice is with a rice cooker. These can generally be procured at any home appliances store for anywhere from 20-200 dollars. Purists may frown upon it, but stow your pride and go out and get one if this seems right for you. There is no easier way to cook rice!

  • 1 cup of rice
  • 1 and ¼ cup of water
  • 1 tsp of salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp of vegetable oil or butter (optional)
  • Mix ingredients inside rice cooker, press button to “Cook”, and wait for the light to come on indicating it is done (about 20 minutes). That’s it!

    For those looking for more of a challenge and a more traditional approach, there are several ways for cooking rice on the stovetop.

    Recipe #2

    The basic standard recipe for white rice on a stovetop. For this recipe, the ratio of rice to water is 1:2, so always add twice as much water as rice and scale up or down depending on your needs.

  • 1 cup of rice
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 tsp of salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp of vegetable oil or butter (optional)
  • Bring water, salt, and butter to a boil in a saucepan. Stir in rice and reduce heat to a very low simmer. Place the burner on the lowest setting and cover the pot with a lid. After 18 minutes, check it (do not remove the lid before this point, as it will allow the steam to escape). You know it is done when it is firm but tender (not crunchy) and slightly sticky but not gummy. If there is any excess water in the pan at this point, drain it off. Leave the lid off and allow to sit for 5 minutes to firm up, then fluff with a fork and serve.

    Recipe #3

    For a more flavorful version, use the “sofrito” technique. This is commonly used throughout Latin America, and involves a sauté of rich ingredients that is added to the rice. Again, scale up or down as necessary.

  • 2 cups of rice
  • 4 cups of boiling water
  • 2 tsp of salt
  • 2 tbsp of vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 celery stalks
  • (optional: other good ingredients include carrot, tomato, ginger, and bell pepper. Experiment!)
  • Heat oil in saucepan. Add finely chopped vegetables and stir until softened, onions should be clear. Add rice and stir to mix evenly. Continue stirring, and when rice has changed color, add boiling water and salt. Allow water to boil off until you can see the grains of rice. Lower heat to minimum setting, cover, and leave for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, check the rice for texture, and allow more time if necessary.

    Nutrition Facts

    03
    October
    2012

    Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

    Dietary Information For Rice: Pros And Cons

    Nutrition Facts

    Rice, brown, long-grain, cooked

    Calories 111

    Change Serving Size

    1 cup
    Serving Size
    73.09
    Amount Per Serving
    Calories
    111
    Total Fat
    0.9 g
    1%
    Saturated Fat
    0.18 g
    1%
    Cholesterol
    0 mg
    0%
    Sodium
    5 mg
    0%
    Total Carbohydrate
    22.96 g
    8%
    Dietary Fiber
    1.8 g
    7%
    Sugars
    0.35 g
    Protein
    2.58 g
    Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

    Rice is an excellent choice for everyday consumption because it contains many vitamins and minerals and also has a lot of fiber. It is very cheap and therefore easy to add to your budget. However, because of its high calorie and carbohydrate content, it is a good idea to limit how much rice you consume each day.

    Categories: Grains

    5.0/5 rating (4 votes)

    Pros

    Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

    Rice is very filling and very cheap – you can buy many pounds of rice at the supermarket without spending very much money. Rice contains many vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin D, calcium, iron, and riboflavin. It is also very low in fat, cholesterol free, and a great source of iron. If you choose to eat brown rice or whole grain rice, the nutritional value of your meal will go up – whole grain rice is not as processed and therefore contains more nutrients. Brown rice is especially full of fiber, which helps regulate bowel movements.

    Cons

    Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

    Since rice is a grain, it has a lot of carbohydrates. One cup of rice contains nearly 20% of the amount of carbohydrates that you should consume each day. People who are diabetic should be careful how much rice they eat because it can easily affect blood sugar levels. The amount of calories in rice is also relatively high – one cup of white rice contains about 250 calories.

    Cooking Tips

    Rice: that simplest of staples that forms the basis of the diets of billions of people around the world. And yet, cooking rice at home can be frustrating, more often then not producing a soggy slop or a charred mess. However, by following a few simple techniques, figuring out which works best for you, and adapting these methods to the particularities of your kitchen, you can make well-cooked, fluffy, flavorful rice.

  • The following recipes and times are for normal white rice. Other types of rice (such as brown or basmati) require different times and proportions; refer to package instructions.
  • Some rice is sprayed with a nutrient-infused mixture and should not be washed (packaging will indicate this). Otherwise, rinse rice thoroughly prior to cooking to remove excess starch and residual contaminants.
  • Recipes

    Rice: Nutritional Information and Calories

    Here are a few recipes and tips to help you make that perfect rice.

    Recipe #1

    The easiest, most fail-safe method for cooking rice is with a rice cooker. These can generally be procured at any home appliances store for anywhere from 20-200 dollars. Purists may frown upon it, but stow your pride and go out and get one if this seems right for you. There is no easier way to cook rice!

  • 1 cup of rice
  • 1 and ¼ cup of water
  • 1 tsp of salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp of vegetable oil or butter (optional)
  • Mix ingredients inside rice cooker, press button to “Cook”, and wait for the light to come on indicating it is done (about 20 minutes). That’s it!

    For those looking for more of a challenge and a more traditional approach, there are several ways for cooking rice on the stovetop.

    Recipe #2

    The basic standard recipe for white rice on a stovetop. For this recipe, the ratio of rice to water is 1:2, so always add twice as much water as rice and scale up or down depending on your needs.

  • 1 cup of rice
  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 tsp of salt (optional)
  • 1 tbsp of vegetable oil or butter (optional)
  • Bring water, salt, and butter to a boil in a saucepan. Stir in rice and reduce heat to a very low simmer. Place the burner on the lowest setting and cover the pot with a lid. After 18 minutes, check it (do not remove the lid before this point, as it will allow the steam to escape). You know it is done when it is firm but tender (not crunchy) and slightly sticky but not gummy. If there is any excess water in the pan at this point, drain it off. Leave the lid off and allow to sit for 5 minutes to firm up, then fluff with a fork and serve.

    Recipe #3

    For a more flavorful version, use the “sofrito” technique. This is commonly used throughout Latin America, and involves a sauté of rich ingredients that is added to the rice. Again, scale up or down as necessary.

  • 2 cups of rice
  • 4 cups of boiling water
  • 2 tsp of salt
  • 2 tbsp of vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 celery stalks
  • (optional: other good ingredients include carrot, tomato, ginger, and bell pepper. Experiment!)
  • Heat oil in saucepan. Add finely chopped vegetables and stir until softened, onions should be clear. Add rice and stir to mix evenly. Continue stirring, and when rice has changed color, add boiling water and salt. Allow water to boil off until you can see the grains of rice. Lower heat to minimum setting, cover, and leave for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, check the rice for texture, and allow more time if necessary.

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