All About Eggs
02
October
2012

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Dietary Information For Eggs: Pros And Cons

Nutrition Facts

Egg, whole, raw, fresh

Calories 143

Serving Size
100 grams
Amount Per Serving
Calories
143
Total Fat
9.51 g
15%
Saturated Fat
3.126 g
17%
Cholesterol
372 mg
126%
Sodium
142 mg
6%
Total Carbohydrate
0.72 g
<1%
Dietary Fiber
0 g
0%
Sugars
0.37 g
Protein
12.56 g
Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Eggs are a good selection for your everyday diet because they are a great source of protein and are high in many B vitamins. Protein is an essential part of a healthy diet, and eggs are a great way to get protein.  Because of this, eggs are a great way for vegetarians to incorporate protein in their diets since they can not get protein from meat.  Eggs are also great for your budget because they are relatively cheap.

However, because they are high in cholesterol and fat, you should try to limit the amount of eggs you eat.  Try to consume only one egg per day to avoid adding too much cholesterol into your diet.  If you have high cholesterol, it may be a good idea to stop eating eggs entirely, or perhaps to only eat egg whites and omit the yolk.

Categories: Meat and Protein

5.0/5 rating (2 votes)

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Eggs are a great food to eat on a diet.  They are very filling, so they will keep you from being hungry longer.  Egg yolks are also high in vitamins, such as vitamin A, potassium, and folic acid.  One of the best advantages of eggs is that they are a great source of protein.  This is great for people who can't get protein from meat, such as vegetarians.  Financially speaking, eggs are great for your wallet - they are relatively cheap in every supermarket.  They also will keep for quite a long time in the refrigerator, so you don't have to worry about wasting money by them spoiling quickly.

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Have you ever wondered about how many calories in an egg? One of the biggest disadvantages of eggs is that they are high in cholesterol.  One egg holds between 50 and 90% of the daily recommended amount of cholesterol.  People who are trying to watch their cholesterol levels should limit the amount of eggs in their diet, or perhaps cut eggs out of their diet entirely.  Another solution is to only eat the egg white and cut out the yolk - the yolk is where most of the cholesterol is found.  Another downside is that eggs are quite high in fat and saturated fat.  If you are trying to cut down on fat in your diet, it might be a good idea to limit the amount of eggs you eat.

What's more, eggs are known to carry salmonella, so it is important to make sure that the egg is cooked thoroughly.  This is especially important for older people and young children who tend to have weaker immune systems.

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Eggs are a really versatile ingredient that can be used in a lot of different dishes. But there are several tips that will ensure you get a perfect egg dish every time.

The first thing you want to do is tell if your eggs are fresh or not. Fill a deep bowl with water. Lower the egg into the water. A fresh egg will sink and lie on its side. As it gets less fresh, it won't sink and instead will stand straight up. That doesn't mean you can't still use it. If it doesn't touch the bottom at all and floats at the top of the water, it's gone bad and should be tossed.

There are different ways to eat an egg by itself – poached, hard-boiled, fried, scrambled, etc. And each has its own technique.

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Poached Eggs

For a poached egg, fill a small pan almost full with water and bring it to just below the boiling point. Add a little bit of white vinegar in the water, too. Crack an egg into a measuring cup or something with a handle on it. Don't beat the egg! Lower the cup into the water and gently slide the whole egg into the water. You'll start to see the egg white get white - that's a good sign! Don't stir the eggs. Wait for about 4 minutes or until the egg white is completely set. The egg yolk will be wiggly still. Get under the egg with a slotted spoon and lift it out of the water. You may want to pat it with a paper towel to get some of the water off of it.

Hard-boiled Eggs

To get a perfectly hard-boiled egg, start with putting the eggs in a pan and covering them with cold water. Bring the water to a boil. Then, turn off the heat and cover the pot. Let the eggs sit in there for 12 minutes; then, take them out and run them under cool water until they've cooled down.

Fried or Scrambled Eggs

The technique here is pretty similar with one key difference – you don't beat or scramble the fried egg. You start with a little butter in a skillet over medium high heat. For a fried egg, crack the egg into the pan. Let it sit for about 4 minutes or until the egg white starts to look white. You'll want the yolk to be fairly set when you take it off. For a scrambled egg, beat the egg (if you like, you can add a little milk and salt). Pour the egg into the pan and let it sit for a couple minutes. Start to scramble it with a wooden spoon or spatula and cook it until it's to your liking.

Enjoy your new skills cooking delicious eggs!

Nutrition Facts

02
October
2012

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Dietary Information For Eggs: Pros And Cons

Nutrition Facts

Egg, whole, raw, fresh

Calories 143

Serving Size
100 grams
Amount Per Serving
Calories
143
Total Fat
9.51 g
15%
Saturated Fat
3.126 g
17%
Cholesterol
372 mg
126%
Sodium
142 mg
6%
Total Carbohydrate
0.72 g
<1%
Dietary Fiber
0 g
0%
Sugars
0.37 g
Protein
12.56 g
Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Eggs are a good selection for your everyday diet because they are a great source of protein and are high in many B vitamins. Protein is an essential part of a healthy diet, and eggs are a great way to get protein.  Because of this, eggs are a great way for vegetarians to incorporate protein in their diets since they can not get protein from meat.  Eggs are also great for your budget because they are relatively cheap.

However, because they are high in cholesterol and fat, you should try to limit the amount of eggs you eat.  Try to consume only one egg per day to avoid adding too much cholesterol into your diet.  If you have high cholesterol, it may be a good idea to stop eating eggs entirely, or perhaps to only eat egg whites and omit the yolk.

Categories: Meat and Protein

5.0/5 rating (2 votes)

Pros

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Eggs are a great food to eat on a diet.  They are very filling, so they will keep you from being hungry longer.  Egg yolks are also high in vitamins, such as vitamin A, potassium, and folic acid.  One of the best advantages of eggs is that they are a great source of protein.  This is great for people who can't get protein from meat, such as vegetarians.  Financially speaking, eggs are great for your wallet - they are relatively cheap in every supermarket.  They also will keep for quite a long time in the refrigerator, so you don't have to worry about wasting money by them spoiling quickly.

Cons

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Have you ever wondered about how many calories in an egg? One of the biggest disadvantages of eggs is that they are high in cholesterol.  One egg holds between 50 and 90% of the daily recommended amount of cholesterol.  People who are trying to watch their cholesterol levels should limit the amount of eggs in their diet, or perhaps cut eggs out of their diet entirely.  Another solution is to only eat the egg white and cut out the yolk - the yolk is where most of the cholesterol is found.  Another downside is that eggs are quite high in fat and saturated fat.  If you are trying to cut down on fat in your diet, it might be a good idea to limit the amount of eggs you eat.

What's more, eggs are known to carry salmonella, so it is important to make sure that the egg is cooked thoroughly.  This is especially important for older people and young children who tend to have weaker immune systems.

Cooking Tips

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Eggs are a really versatile ingredient that can be used in a lot of different dishes. But there are several tips that will ensure you get a perfect egg dish every time.

The first thing you want to do is tell if your eggs are fresh or not. Fill a deep bowl with water. Lower the egg into the water. A fresh egg will sink and lie on its side. As it gets less fresh, it won't sink and instead will stand straight up. That doesn't mean you can't still use it. If it doesn't touch the bottom at all and floats at the top of the water, it's gone bad and should be tossed.

There are different ways to eat an egg by itself – poached, hard-boiled, fried, scrambled, etc. And each has its own technique.

Recipes

Egg: Nutritional Information and Calories

Poached Eggs

For a poached egg, fill a small pan almost full with water and bring it to just below the boiling point. Add a little bit of white vinegar in the water, too. Crack an egg into a measuring cup or something with a handle on it. Don't beat the egg! Lower the cup into the water and gently slide the whole egg into the water. You'll start to see the egg white get white - that's a good sign! Don't stir the eggs. Wait for about 4 minutes or until the egg white is completely set. The egg yolk will be wiggly still. Get under the egg with a slotted spoon and lift it out of the water. You may want to pat it with a paper towel to get some of the water off of it.

Hard-boiled Eggs

To get a perfectly hard-boiled egg, start with putting the eggs in a pan and covering them with cold water. Bring the water to a boil. Then, turn off the heat and cover the pot. Let the eggs sit in there for 12 minutes; then, take them out and run them under cool water until they've cooled down.

Fried or Scrambled Eggs

The technique here is pretty similar with one key difference – you don't beat or scramble the fried egg. You start with a little butter in a skillet over medium high heat. For a fried egg, crack the egg into the pan. Let it sit for about 4 minutes or until the egg white starts to look white. You'll want the yolk to be fairly set when you take it off. For a scrambled egg, beat the egg (if you like, you can add a little milk and salt). Pour the egg into the pan and let it sit for a couple minutes. Start to scramble it with a wooden spoon or spatula and cook it until it's to your liking.

Enjoy your new skills cooking delicious eggs!

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